New Design of Matricula online

Matricula online  is the platform for research in church books of Austria. There are also several documents for  Germany (Bisphoprics Hildesheim, Magdeburg, Münster and Passau) and Poland (State Archive of Breslau/Wroclaw) available.

Some weeks ago,  Matricula online introduced a new design. (The “old design” can be used until the end of 2017).

I did work with the new design in the mean time. There are great new functionalities and working with the new design is very efficient.

Now, there are three ways to get to a specific church book:

Matricula Menu Bar

Matricula Online, Menu Bar

  • Fonds: you can search the whole database of available documents
  • Map: This completely new functionality is great. By searching a village/city on the map, you can see all parishes close by and enter directly into the list of available church books for this parish. This functionality is particularly helpful, if you came to a brick wall in a parish, as you can quickly see what other parishes are near ans continue searching there.
    (Blue marks on the map show the  place you were looking for, red marks show parishes. By clicking on their name, you immediately get to the list of available church books of this parish.)
  • Search for Places: The functionality to search for places was significantly improved:
    There is now the possibility to restrict the search to specific dioceses or specific dates. If a place is entered, the list of results will include all possible results with notes of the parish.

The overview page of a parish also looks differently now. A photo of the parish church was added and there is also an up-to-date as well as a historic map (from mapire, a page with historic maps). With this additions, you can easily get an impression of the local area.

There is a possibility to show only specific types of books and to restrict the date of books.

When you found the curch book you were looking for, there are two possibilities:

  • Using the book symbol, you will be shown details on the book.
  • Using the camera symbol, you will directly get to the church book.

There are also some new functions for the navigation with church books.

Most functionalities are self-explanatory, but here are some additional notes:

  • The symbol of the house resets all changes.
  • Using the symbol with the square and arrow, you will receive the direct link to the page which can be copied using the right mouse button.
  • Using the book symbol, you can remove the side bar with the page numbers.
  • This info symbol gives detailed information on the currently opened book. This information was permanently given in the upper right corner in the earlier version of Matricula, which was actually better.
    UPDATE 8.6.2017: As I just saw, the information in the upper right corner was reinstated and gives now the parrish, the type of book with its reference number as well as the years which are covered in the book.

There is a navigation bar in all overview and church book pages which enables a quick navigation through the pages.

Matricula Navigationsleiste

Matricula online Navigation Bar

Matricula online is available in German and English. Language can be set in the upper right corner.

What is still missing is the possibility to download single pages, as it is offered at family search for example. You have to continue working with screenshots.

Overall, I have to say that I really like the new functionalities of Matricula which make it a great basis for research in church books.

Additional tipps for working with Matricula online and Church books, can be found in my earlier posts:

 

How to find your ancestors in Vienna

IMG_8403

“Parterre in Schönbrunn” by Alois Greil (1841-1902) from the book “Die österreichisch-ungarische Monarchie in Wort und Bild”, Band Vienna, Vienna 1886, page 115

History of Vienna

Particularly in the second half of the 19th century, Vienna, then capital of the Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy, was a fast-growing city. During this area, the city railway and the “Hochquellwasserleitung” (water pipeline from the Schneeberg mountain) were built.
While Vienna had 726,000 inhabitants in 1880, this number grew to 1,365,000 in 1890 through the incorporation of the suburban villages. In 1910 2,031,000 people were living in Vienna (1).
Additionally, many war fugitives came to Vienna during World War I.
Currently, Vienna has 1,841,000 inhabitants, by the way.

Due to this massive migration to the city, Vienna also becomes interesting for genealogists whose ancestors moved there.

Family Research Sources for Vienna

It is actually not so easy to find ancestors in Vienna. Therefore, I would like to introduce you to some useful sources and give you some tips.
Some of the links I provide in the following, are only available in German, but I will try to explain the functionality and hope, it can provide help to English-speaking researchers.

Address Book of Vienna: “Adolph Lehmann’s allgemeiner Wohnungs-Anzeiger”

The socalled „Lehmann“ („Adolph Lehmann’s allgemeiner Wohnungs-Anzeiger“) is a very good start for Viennese research. It is a directory of Vienna’s inhabitants which has been published annually in the years 1859 – 1942. The Lehmann directory has been digitised and is available online for free on the Homepage „Wienbibliothek Digital“ (follow this link).

The directory includes the head of the family (not wife or children), mostly with a profession. Servants, trade assistants and day laborers are not included.

Each annual book consists of several chapters which can be chosen in an online register. There are (among several others) directories of magistrates, companies, sights and newspapers. For genealogists, the directory of names (“Namenverzeichnis”) is surely the most important one.

Very often, there is also a street directory (“Straßenverzeichnis”), in which the responsible parish for the address is included.
For some years (e.g. 1925), there is also a directory of houses (“Häuserverzeichnis”). This is a directory of inhabitants sorted by address. Through this directory, you can establish who lived in a certain house, for example to find neighbors of your ancestors.

Functionality:
Here, you are at the right page to choose a year. Once, you have established the year, you will see a page, where you can choose the part of the directory (“Band”). As the content of books varies, try all available options, until you find, what you are looking for. The chapters written in bold script, are the important ones. Look for the clues: “Namenverzeichnis” – Directory of names
“Häuserverzeichnis” – Directory of houses
“Straßenverzeichnis” – Directory of streets
Subsequently, you can select a letter or an address to proceed.

Search for Deceased Persons by  Viennese Cementeries (“Friedhöfe Wien”)

The search for deceased persons of the Viennese cemeteries (follow this link) is available for currently existing graves and for graves that no longer exist and thus is a valuable source to find deceased ancestors.

This is the search form:

Fields:
– Name: Enter first and/or last name of the person you are looking for
– Friedhof (Cemetery): You can restrict your search for a specific cemetery, but do not
  have to
– Jahr der Bestattung (Year of burial): You can restrict the time frame you are looking for.
– Historische Grabsuche: Select “aktuell” for existing graves and “historisch” for graves
  that no longer exist.
– Suchen: Search / Neue Suche: New Search

The search result can contain very useful information as age, date of birth, and date of death (varies from record to record). Additionally, all other persons buried in the same grave are shown which are very probably relatives, wife, husband or children. However, it has to be noted, that for the historic search, other people buried in this grave do not necessarily have to be related, as they may have been buried there at a different time.

In any case, it is usually worth to try both searches – historic and current. There is also a map showing the exact location of the grave.

Population Cards Familysearch

Familysearch offers an interesting collection in its catalogue:
Austria, Vienna, Population Cards 1850-1896

The time period given might be confusing. The collection actually includes population cards as of approx. 1905, which have been issued for persons born before 1897.
The search result includes information on the date and place of birth, spouse/wife and district in which the person lived (no detailed address).
The original population cards are available in the Vienna Municipal and Provincial Archive. You can search the collection for free there. There is also a possibility to ask the Archive for the document and detailed address (see here for details). However, there is a fee charged by the archive for research: EUR 35 for every half hour.

Further Data Bases

The data bases of  genteam (free registration required) and of Familia Austria (partly free, partly tied to a membership) both give information on baptisms, marriages and deaths of Viennese inhabitants. At Familia Austria, the deceased persons whose death was published in the Viennese Newspaper have been collected. Those are also available at ANNO of the Austrian National Library through a search for the name.

Historic City Maps and Photos

There is a  Wien-Wiki which offers historic maps of Vienna.

There is also a street directory (“Liste topographischer Objekte“), where you can search for a street and get information, as e.g. responsible parish or special sights in the street.

In the Photo Gallery (“Bildergalerie“), there are several pictures of historic houses. If you are lucky, the house you are looking for is among them. If not, you at least get an idea, how an area in Vienna looked like in the past centuries.

There are also interesting historic maps at the Vienna Library Online (“Wienbibliothek digital).

Source:

(1) https://www.wien.gv.at/kultur/archiv/geschichte/ueberblick/stadtwachstum.html

Land Registers and Family Research – Family Weihs in Sachsendorf, Austria

As entries in land registers offer a good insight into family history, I would like to write about this topic today.

Introduction of the land register in Austria

Maria Theresia started a first register of houses in 1770 (see also here) which was the predecessor of our modern land register. Land registers contain a lot of information on properties and their owners. Today, I would like to focus on the owners.

Documents at Familysearch

At Familysearch, there are many Austrian seigneurial records available online (free registration required). To get to the right records, use the menue “Search” and there “Catalogue”.  As location, enter “Austria”. You will get to a long list of different records, where you have to select “Court Records” and there you are:
Austria, seigniorial records = Österreich, Herrschaftsakten, 1537-1920

Family Weihs in Sachsendorf, Lower Austria

Using the example of the family Weihs of Sachsendorf (district Kirchberg am Wagram, Lower Austria), I would like to illustrate the support which a land register can offer for family research.

Mathias Weihs was my Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandfather. So far, I know that he was born in 1724 in Kollersdorf close to Sachsendorf and that he was married to Anna Maria Leuthner (widow of Stephan Kienast). I did not do much more research on his family yet (except for my direct ancestor, his son Paul).

Titel Grundbuch Sachsensdorf, NIederösterreich

Title page of the land register Sachsensdorf, Lower Austria, source citation see end of the blog post

Transcription and Translation: “Land register of the village of Sachsendorf of all properties with houses and all agricultural properties”

Through the above shown land register  („Haus-Überland-Grundbuch Amt Sachsendorf“) which is available online at Familysearch (Source citation see end of the blog post), I found out that Mathias Weihs owned several properties in Sachsendorf.
This was one of them:

 

Titel des Grundbucheintrages, Quellenangabe siehe Ende des Posts

Name/Title of the property, source citation see end of the blog post

Transkription and translation: “Von einem Bauernhaus, dareingehören 3 1/2 Joch Acker” – Of one farm house, including 3 1/2 Joch fields; Joch is an old square measure

From the entry in the land register, one can see the following chain of owners:

Besitzerkette Eintrag Grundbuch Sachsendorf, Quellenangabe siehe Ende des Posts

Owners in land register entry Sachsendorf, source citation see end of the blog post

Thus, the following persons were owners of the farm house:

  • Mathias Weihs and his wife Anna Maria („ux.“ is short for uxoris, wife) as of 1759
  • Franz Weihs, first unmarried as of 1788 and subsequently with his wife Elisabeth as of 1790 (from Sachsendorf, formerly written as Saxendorf)
  • Joseph Weihs, unmarried as of 1817 by acquisition (for 4,000 Gulden, the former Austrian currency, abbreviated as „fl.“)
  • Joseph Weihs und his wife Anna Maria as of 1817 by marriage
  • Johann Weihs, unmarried, living in the farm house- by acquisition in 1849 for 1,200 Gulden

All this information give a good overview and there are enough facts for a more detailed research. As mentioned in the illustration of the scope of the parish Kirchberg am Wagram at Matricula-online, the parish Kirchberg am Wagram includes Sachsendorf until 1784, afterwards, the parish Altenwörth includes the records for Sachsendorf (both are within the Arch-Dioceses of Vienna).

From research in the church books, I found out the following:

  • Mathias Weihs and Anna Maria Leuthner married on 22.7.1759 in Sachsendorf.
  • According to the land register, Franz Weihs married in 1790, which simplifies the search in the book of marriages of the parish Altenwörth:
 On 22.1.1790, Franz Weihs, son of Mathias Weihs and Anna Maria Leuthner married Elisabeth Nesterl. From the entry, one can also deduct the year of birth of Franz Weihs: He was 25 years of age at the time of the wedding, therefore he was born in 1765. It actually was on 27.5.1764, as the baptismal book of the parish Kirchberg am Wagram shows.
  • Joseph Weihs acquired the property from the couple Franz and Elisabeth Weihs (who by the way died in 1830 and 1828 respectively).
 Now it is getting more difficult, as the land register does not give information on the relationship between Joseph and Franz. Brother? Son? Nephew?
    As the next two entries in the land register have both been made in 1817, it can be assumed that it is for the same Joseph, who was married to a woman named Anna Maria in 1817. And there really is a wedding of Joseph Weihs and Anna Maria Entlang on 11.11.1817 in the church book. The church book gives us the information that Joseph was the son of Franz and Elisabeth Weihs and that he was born in 1791.
    By the way, this is the starting point for further research, as I have to try to find the purchase contract between Franz and Joseph. How could son Joseph afford to buy land for 4,000 Gulden which was quite some money at that time?
  • The next and last owner in the land register is Johann Weihs who also acquired the property. He was unmarried.
    During the time in question, there were three baptisms of boys named Johann Weihs. It is most probable that the right Johann is the son of Joseph and Anna Maria Weihs who was born on 15.8.1825. Any doubt can however only be eliminated through looking at the purchase contract.

Finally, I could establish the following facts with the support of the land register:

Ahnentafel Johann Weihs Kopie

Source Citation Familysearch – Land register:
“Österreich Herrschaftsakten 1537-1920,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9K9-BS3H?cc=1929847&wc=MYCG-BZQ%3A1062206102%2C1047408502%2C1062215703%2C1062215702%2C1062221701 : 20 May 2014), Österreich  \> Lower Austria (Niederösterreich) \> Kirchberg am Wagram \> Herrschaft Grafenegg mit Freihof Etsdorf \> image 13 of 200; Landesarchiv, Österreich (national archives, Austria).

Working with Austrian Church Books – Part 3: Finding the Right Book

Working with Austrian Church Books – Part 3: Finding the Right Book

Austrian Roman Catholic Church Books are the main source for Family History Research in Austria .This post is part of a series explaining how to find information you are looking for in Austrian church records.

Please also see:

Part 1: Finding the right Roman Catholic Diocese
Part 2: Finding the right Roman Catholic Parish

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UPDATE JUNE 2017: Matricula has introduced a new design with new functionalities. Details can be found in my new post: New Design of Matricula online

**********************************************************************************

Part 3: Finding the right Church Book

In my last post of this series, I showed you how to find the right parish. Now, we want to move forward to find the right book.

There are three main types of church registers:

  • Baptismal Records
  • Marriage Records
  • Death Records

Although the registers are usually separate books, particularly in earlier times, all three records were entered in one book, in separate sections.

I will use the example of Theresia Wallner to show you, how to find the right book: Theresia Wallner was born on 17.2.1799 in the village of Thann. Thann is a part of the parish of Pottschach in the Arch-Diocese of Vienna.

 

Using Matricula, you can see that the following information:

In total, there are 28 books („Bücher“) available for the parish of Pottschach.

  • „Signatur“ means the title number of the book
  • „Kirchenbuch/Sakrament“ gives you the type of records in the book
  • „Laufzeit“ is the term for which entries are recorded

You can sort the list according to all of the above.

In the list, there are different types of books:

  • Taufbuch: Baptismal Records
  • Trauungsbuch: Marriage Records
  • Sterbebuch: Death Records
  • Tauf-, Trauungs- und Sterbebuch: all of the above combined in one book
  • Index Taufe: Index of baptismal entries (Sometimes, if a church book does not include an index of entries, there is a separate index for a certain term)
  • Index Trauungen: Index of marriage entries
  • Index Sterbebuch: Index of death entires

As we are looking for a baptismal record in 1799, this would be the book, we are looking for:

By clicking on the camera-symbol beside the book, you even get more information:

Beside the type of entries in the book („Buchtyp“) and the time period covered („Zeitraum“), you can also see that this particular book includes an index of the entries („Enthält: Index“) and the location of the original book („Lagerungsort“) which in this case is the local parish.

Finally, by clicking on the camera symbol again, you can access the particular book directly. (If you would like to go back to the list of entries, click on „Liste der Bücher“ which means „List of books“.)

In the next part of the series, we will search for the right entry in the book.

All the vocabulary above is also entered into my Vocabulary List here.

This post is part of a series:

Part 1: Finding the right Roman Catholic diocese
Part 2: Finding the right Parish
Part 3: Finding the right Church Book
Part 4: Finding the right Entry
Part 5: Information given in Baptismal Records
Part 6: Information given in Marriage Records
Part 7: Information given in Death Records
Part 8: Other Religious confessions

Research Template Church Book Index

I have to admit that my research has been really unorganized in the beginning, but I guess I was overwhelmed by the available information. On the internet, I have found some research templates in the meantime for a better organization. However, none is fully practical for me. Therefore, I tried designing my own template.

bildschirmfoto-2017-03-04-um-19-41-49

You can download the template here as PDF. This template is intended for the collection of entries of an index of a church book when searching for a particular surname. The template also includes a detailed explanation on the last page.

While I so far took note of all the entries on a piece of paper which I could not find any more months later, I now intend to keep this filled-in template and if I am researching a certain name/book for more details or for relatives of the persons in my family tree at a later point in time, I do not have to undertake the entire seaching again.(Although it can also be quite useful to start again from scratch, as it is always possible that I did not notice some relevant information the first time).

Anyway, I hope you find the template useful as well!

Working with Austrian Church Books – Part 2: Finding the right Parish

Working with Austrian Church Books – Part 2: Finding the right Parish

Austrian Roman Catholic Church Books are the main source for Family History Research in Austria. This post is part of a series explaining how to find information you are looking for in Austrian church records.

Please also see:
Part 1: Finding the right Roman Catholic Diocese

*********************************************************************************

UPDATE JUNE 2017: Matricula has introduced a new design with new functionalities. Details can be found in my new post: New Design of Matricula online

**********************************************************************************

Part 2: Finding the right Roman Catholic Parish

Using my ancestor Mathias Schindl as example, I will show you ways to find the right parish. I know from other sources that he was born in Finsternau.

The easiest way to find out where to look is the gazetteer at Genteam. Genteam is a free database for genealogical research in Austria (and some other countries of the former Habsburg monarchy). You only have to register to use its many possibilities.) If the page is in German, there is a button in the upper right corner to switch to English.

According to Genteam, there is only one village called Finsternau which belongs to the parish of Brand near Gmünd in Lower Austria. The details in Genteam give even more information. This parish belongs to the diocese of Lower Austria/St.Pölten. There are church registers available as of 1784. Before belonging to the parish Brand, Finsternau was part of the parish of Zuggers in Bohemia.

Matricula-online
(Vienna, Lower Austria, Upper Austria, Salzburg , Carinthia and Vorarlberg)

In Matricula, where we will find the church registers for Brand, there is also an integrated search, which however will not work for all dioceses. It does work for Lower Austria. At Matricula you can also switch to English in the blue banner on the top. Next to the language switch is the „search button“. If you enter „Finsternau“ in the field „Search Word“ and click on „Show all results“ afterwards, it will lead you directly to the parish of Brand/Gmuend.

You would also get there by selecting the following in the window on the left:
„AT Österreich/Austria“ – „AT DSP St.Pölten“ (which is the capital of Lower Austria) – „A…C“ and then „Brand/Gmuend“.

In the subsequent overview screen, there is plenty of information available (the vocabulary is also included in my Vocabulary sheet):

  • Zeitraum von – Records available as of
  • Zeitraum bis – records available until
  • Verwaltungsgeschichte – Historic scope of the parish
    • Aktueller Pfarrbereich: Lists all villages currently within the scope of the parish
    • Historische Abweichungen – Differences in scope in the past
  • Matrikenführung: details on register types and availability (Gegenwart meaning now)

The most important button is „List of all records of record group“ – there you will see all church registers of the parish.

Styria

The possibility to search for villages exists also in the diocese Graz-Seckau (Styria). There is a field „Pfarre/Ort“ where you can enter the village you are looking for. In the window on the left you can also look for the right parish.

Tyrol

In the upper left corner you will find a field to search for a village or parish – just enter the name and click „Suchen“ (Search).

One important note: Parish boundaries did change over time. Particularly in 1783/1784, many new parishes were founded. So if you do not find a record in a parish, it always makes sense to look in surrounding parishes as well.

In my next post of the series, I will give you details on the different church books in Austria. If you have any specific questions regarding the work with church registers, please leave a comment.

This post is part of a series:
Part 1: Finding the right Roman Catholic diocese
Part 2: Finding the right Parish
Part 3: Finding the right Church Book
Part 4: Finding the right Entry
Part 5: Information given in Baptismal Records
Part 6: Information given in Marriage Records
Part 7: Information given in Death Records
Part 8: Other Religious confessions

Historic Austrian Newspapers

A real treasure chest for researchers of family history are historic newspapers. At ANNO (Austrian Newspapers Online, a digitalization initiative of the Austrian National Library) you can search through the text of an enormous amount of historic newspapers and magazines from 1689-1945. ANNO does not only include Austrian Newspapers, but papers from all over Europe, some even in other languages like English, French, Italian or Polish.

Yesterday, I found out through ANNO that the sister of my Great-great-grandfather, Josefa Korinek was the eldest woman in Vienna when she died in 1939, aged 103. I was thrilled to read through the story of her life and there were even two photographs!

1938-korinek-josefa-2

Source: ANNO/Austrian National Library, Illustrierte Kronen Zeitung 6.3.1938, page 6

If you want to try ANNO, go to the ANNO Search page and enter the name you are looking for in the the field “Suche:” (Suche is Search in German). You can use search operators such as:

“First Name Last Name” will search for exactly this expression
“First Name, Last Name”~5 will do a context search where the two words are not more than 5 words apart (I mostly use this search with a family name and the name of a village).

Good luck searching! I hope you will get new information!